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Mental Health by the Numbers

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You Are Not Alone

    • 19.1% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2018 (47.6 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.
    • 4.6% of U.S. adults experienced serious mental illness in 2018 (11.4 million people). This represents 1 in 25 adults.
    • 16.5% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder in 2016 (7.7 million people)
    • 3.7% of U.S. adults experienced a co-occurring substance use disorder and mental illness in 2018 (9.2 million people)

 

    • Annual prevalence of mental illness among U.S. adults, by demographic group:
      • Non-Hispanic Asian: 14.7%
      • Non-Hispanic white: 20.4%
      • Non-Hispanic black or African-American: 16.2%
      • Non-Hispanic mixed/multiracial: 26.8%
      • Hispanic or Latino: 16.9%
      • Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual: 37.4%

 

  • Annual prevalence among U.S. adults, by condition:
    • Major Depressive Episode: 7.2% (17.7 million people)
    • Schizophrenia: <1% (estimated 1.5 million people)
    • Bipolar Disorder: 2.8% (estimated 7 million people)
    • Anxiety Disorders: 19.1% (estimated 48 million people)
    • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: 3.6% (estimated 9 million people)
    • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: 1.2% (estimated 3 million people)
    • Borderline Personality Disorder: 1.4% (estimated 3.5 million people)

Mental Health Care Matters

  • 43.3% of U.S. adults with mental illness received treatment in 2018
  • 64.1% of U.S. adults with serious mental illness received treatment in 2018
  • 50.6% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 with a mental health disorder received treatment in 2016
  • The average delay between onset of mental illness symptoms and treatment is 11 years
  • Annual treatment rates among U.S. adults with any mental illness, by demographic group:
    • Male: 34.9%
    • Female: 48.6%
    • Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual: 48.5%
    • Non-Hispanic Asian: 24.9%
    • Non-Hispanic white: 49.1%
    • Non-Hispanic black or African-American: 30.6%
    • Non-Hispanic mixed/multiracial: 31.8%
    • Hispanic or Latino: 32.9%
  • 11.3% of U.S. adults with mental illness had no insurance coverage in 2018
  • 13.4% of U.S. adults with serious mental illness had no insurance coverage in 2018
  • 60% of U.S. counties do not have a single practicing psychiatrist

The Ripple Effect Of Mental Illness

PERSON

  • People with depression have a 40% higher risk of developing cardiovascular and metabolic diseases than the general population. People with serious mental illness are nearly twice as likely to develop these conditions.
  • 19.3% of U.S. adults with mental illness also experienced a substance use disorder in 2018 (9.2 million individuals)
  • The rate of unemployment is higher among U.S. adults who have mental illness (5.8%) compared to those who do not (3.6%)
  • High school students with significant symptoms of depression are more than twice as likely to drop out compared to their peers

FAMILY

  • At least 8.4 million people in the U.S. provide care to an adult with a mental or emotional health issue
  • Caregivers of adults with mental or emotional health issues spend an average of 32 hours per week providing unpaid care

COMMUNITY

  • Mental illness and substance use disorders are involved in 1 out of every 8emergency department visits by a U.S. adult (estimated 12 million visits)
  • Mood disorders are the most common cause of hospitalization for all people in the U.S. under age 45 (after excluding hospitalization relating to pregnancy and birth)
  • Across the U.S. economy, serious mental illness causes $193.2 billion in lost earnings each year
  • 20.1% of people experiencing homelessness in the U.S. have a serious mental health condition
  • 37% of adults incarcerated in the state and federal prison system have a diagnosed mental illness
  • 70.4% of youth in the juvenile justice system have a diagnosed mental illness
  • 41% of Veteran’s Health Administration patients have a diagnosed mental illness or substance use disorder

WORLD

  • Depression and anxiety disorders cost the global economy $1 trillion in lost productivity each year
  • Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide

It’s Okay To Talk About Suicide

  • Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death among people aged 10-34 in the U.S.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • The overall suicide rate in the U.S. has increased by 31% since 2001
  • 46% of people who die by suicide had a diagnosed mental health condition
  • 90% of people who die by suicide had shown symptoms of a mental health condition, according to interviews with family, friends and medical professionals (also known as psychological autopsy)
  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are 4x more likely to attempt suicide than straight youth
  • 75% of people who die by suicide are male
  • Transgender adults are nearly 12x more likely to attempt suicide than the general population
  • Annual prevalence of serious thoughts of suicide, by U.S. demographic group:
    • 4.3% of all adults
    • 11.0% of young adults aged 18-25
    • 17.2% of high school students
    • 47.7% of lesbian, gay, and bisexual high school students

 

If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 immediately.

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